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March 20 2017

Dear vegetarians, you could do much better

I don’t know how things are done in the UK, but in the US, killing off male calves and older milk cows simply isn’t done by any dairy I’ve heard of. Regardless of how individual owners feel about the cows, it wouldn’t make monetary sense to randomly slaughter something that cost money to produce and could generate more income by being sold.

I worked on a dairy and I recognize that one dairy is not exactly the same as any other dairy, but it was pretty average as they go and matches what I’ve seen and heard at other dairies and from people who work at them, around the country. The cows there are happy and have a complex social structure. They’re intelligent and clever animals and are treated as such. Their ability to unlatch gates and doors with their tongues (some are masters of this) is talked about by workers with a mixture of impressed amusement and exasperation.

They’re checked at every milking for injuries and treated well. There is nothing stressful to a cow about walking into a room and having a machine attached to her teats. They could very easily kick the machines off of their udders and if they’re feeling mischievous or if the machine doesn’t feel quite right to them, they do. No force is used, the cows walk in there by themselves. If you’ve ever tried to force a cow to do anything, you’d know this just wouldn’t happen if the cows didn’t want it to.

When a cow stops producing the amount of milk she should, she is put up for sale. Usually, there is a family or a smaller dairy or a breeder who is more than happy to buy her. Sometimes, she is simply retired. Very often, she ends up spending the rest of her life on someone’s farm somewhere. In many cases, the dairy workers themselves purchase an older cow and keep her on nearby land so they can have their own fresh milk. Sometimes, yes, she does go to slaughter, but she certainly isn’t just killed and discarded.

Bull calves sell very quickly. Some people want them to breed their own cows, since they come from good stock, some people want to raise them for personal slaughter, some are purchased by other smaller dairies and some are purchased to be raised for commercial slaughter. But dairy cows are not bred to carry large amounts of meat, so they almost always go toward further dairy-related purposes, not meat-related ones. The idea of slaughtering them as ‘surplus’ is silly. They do fetch a lower price than female calves, but dairies, like most farm industries, are struggling to make it by and need what help they can get.

If you don’t want to eat meat because you don’t believe in causing animal deaths, that’s fine and it’s a noble sentiment. But don’t swear off milk and milk-products because you read that dairies butcher their unused cows.

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lobster soap

because, well, lobster soap. do you need a reason for lobster soap?

March 19 2017

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inneroptics:

Philippe Bréson

March 18 2017

I wish people would understand that sex is like ramen.

Pretty much anybody can make ramen if they have the basic equipment. And making ramen isn’t hard. You can make ramen in a cup. It can even be a dirty cup you picked up off the floor. You can make it in a pot or in some fancy ramen cooker dish. There are different flavors of ramen, you can even make more than one pack at a time. And ramen is good, it’s helpful in a lot of situations and it gets you through stuff but ramen is only really good when you add to it.

You can add pretty much whatever you can imagine to ramen, you can add spices, all kinds of ingredients, but it’s not just toppings. It’s also the difference between thinking about what you add, instead of just adding whatever worked last time. Or what’s in the fridge.

It’s about standing there and testing for when the noodles are done instead of wandering away for what’s supposed to be three minutes and is closer to six. It’s standing there laughing with a friend while the water boils, talking about the last time you hung out. It’s pretending it’s gourmet and drinking a glass of wine with it even if you’re using plastic forks.

Stop just microwaving ramen in a chipped cup. Like, if all you’ve got’s a chipped cup, okay, but do something with it. You don’t have to buy anything new or get some exotic sauce you’ve never tasted before. Add something that makes you smile, makes you laugh. Go outside and eat it. Make it while listening to really loud Italian opera and dancing around the kitchen like you’re a fancy chef.

And for the sex side of this, don’t think I’m saying ‘go get some new toys and kinks and try weird stuff’ because that’s not what I’m saying at all. If that makes you happy, sure, go ahead. But I mean stop thinking of it like, ‘I do this, you do this, at least one of us is satisfied, we’re done.’

I always tell partners, “If you’re not laughing during sex, you’re doing it wrong.” Because stupid things happen. Laugh. Don’t be afraid to talk. Add nonsense. Stop in the middle because something funny occurred to you.

Don’t be college-kid ramen made in an unwashed cup.

Reposted byteijakool teijakool

March 17 2017

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destroyed-and-abandoned:

abandoned Railway Tunnel near Wuppertal, Germany

Reposted bymin42 min42

March 16 2017

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erotic-secrets:

Qualifying to go further…

    [Karolina Debczynska by George Kazakov…]

March 15 2017

March 14 2017

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Reposted byAnna-Hexeblackiris
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ice-nix:

I’m pretty sure I’d always heard that it was so that, if your body was found, people could use the earring to pay for your funeral.

@MitreSquareMurder you’re the pirate expert, help me out on this.

18th Century Nautical History Geek, activate!

Pirates (and other seafarers) actually wore earrings for complicated, multi-faceted reasons, but first you have to understand that earrings then aren’t the same as earrings now.

The average earring now isn’t worth anything; even if you have one that’s actually made of gold, you’d have to take it to a pawnshop and try and convince them to give you something for it.  But in the past, walking around with a gold earring was essentially walking around with a large piece of currency that conveniently didn’t have any nation of origin on it.

Seafarers have always been notoriously bad with money. They lived incredibly harsh lives that were usually short and often ended brutally. In theory, it was possible to save up the money you made (either in wages or pirate loot) but you never knew when you were going to die, so most men spent all of their money immediately on alcohol, tobacco, women and whatever else they wanted, and then immediately had to go back to sea to get some more.

The gold earring represented a piece of emergency money. As long as you kept firmly resolved to never spend it on fun times (who knows how many men didn’t have that willpower), even if your pockets were empty, if something really bad happened, you had that chunk of cash. It couldn’t be stolen out of your pockets and it didn’t matter what country you found yourself in.

Since people first started paddling on the ocean, sailors have been deeply superstitious. For a sailor, there were whole lists: things you couldn’t do on a certain day, words you couldn’t say, colors things couldn’t be, things that were bad signs, things that were good signs, things that brought storms, things that made storms go away. They were often contradictory and often fiercely argued about.

Unlike in the movies, sailors came from, and travelled to, all parts of the world and were often of mixed ancestry and cultures, especially pirates. As more parts of the world traded with each other, sailors came in contact with more cultures, more traditions and more superstitions that they adopted. Many African and Native American and Central American groups have their own beliefs about the benefits of piercings. Many cultures give boys piercings or scars when they become men and some see these as marks of strength or manliness.

In sailing terms, crossing the equator or rounding the Horn for the first time were seen as a kind of coming of age and were celebrated with wild hazing activities, including sometimes piercing the boy’s ears. So it’s likely that the average sailor would have some of this context in mind when getting a gold earring. We also know from some contemporary descriptions of pirate crews that some of them had piercings in other areas of their face, some with wood and bone. It would seem, then, that other culture or aesthetic values were going on. Pirates, in particular, were pretty rebellious fellows and may have gotten facial jewelry for the same reason many people do today.

It is possible that it is from the Chinese, some of whom believe that an acupuncture spot in the ear benefits vision, that seafarers got the idea that earrings improved eyesight, though I have not actually read this fact in historical literature itself.

Finally, it is certainly true that many people believed that if they did not receive a proper burial their soul would not rest or they would not be able to go on to whatever they believed awaited them. Some also believed that some afterlife figure or other would require a fee.

Therefore, as @ice-nix says, it was hoped that whoever found the body would be honest (or afraid of being haunted) enough to make sure you were buried well.


TL;DR: Wearing a gold earring served the triple purpose of always-ready emergency money, fulfilling whatever benefits your culture believed came with piercings (strength, better eyesight, coming of age, manliness, making you look badass, whatever) and making sure you didn’t end up a ghost.

March 13 2017

0919 9964
Reposted byjazziee jazziee
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Caribbean Sea Map handbag by RESTYLE $75.00                                                                    

March 12 2017

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blood stains shirt by FallnAngelCreations

Reposted byLuukka Luukka

March 11 2017

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corset ring by raulsouza $95

March 10 2017

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Reposted bycathillium cathillium

March 09 2017

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beardbriarandrose:

Montague Dawson (1895-1973), Wind in the Rigging, oil on canvas

Reposted byLuukkamoonwhale

March 08 2017

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the halls inside my head

March 07 2017

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March 06 2017

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fascinator by KopfTraeume $70

March 05 2017

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